Category Archives: IT Services

‘How to’ Guide for specifying an IT Cabling System [Part 3] – ‘Cable Pathways, Installation Techniques and Documentation’

This is the third in a series of posts where we offer guidelines on how to produce a specification for an IT cabling system.

Today we look at what you should consider when installing containment and cable, and we list the components which make up a well-documented cabling system.

CABLE PATHWAYS AND CONTAINMENT

Cable pathways can be located above ceilings, under floors, in risers between floors, underground or overhead between buildings. In most instances, the cabling will require dedicated containment such as trunking, conduit, cable tray, matting, cable basket or ducts.

The following should be considered:

  • Designing pathways that keep cable lengths within limits
  • Specifying the most suitable containment for the pathway
  • Consider who has responsibility for the pathways and designing the containment system, e.g. architect, mechanical and electrical contractor or the cabling installer
  • Capacity, allowing for future growth and to keep fill ratios within the requirements of the BS and EN standards
  • Segregation from other services, particularly electricity supply cabling in accordance with your country’s standards, in the case of the UK it is BS 6701 and BS EN 50174-2 series
  • Suitability for standards conformity e.g. to allow correct bend radii for cables
  • You have permission from the landowner for the installation of ducts
  • Protection of the cable from water, heat, sunlight, physical damage and rodents.

INSTALLATION TECHNIQUES

Suitably qualified installers, complying with relevant standards should be selected to undertake the cabling work. Qualifications would include evidence of the cable manufacturer’s training or training undertaken at a specialised training establishment and supported by a recognized certification.

The installation should adhere to standards, including, where applicable:

  • BS 6701
  • BS EN 7671 (IEE) Wiring Regulations – 17th Edition
  • BS EN 50174 series of standards
  • BS EN 50310
  • BS EN 50346

A good installer will not:

  • Exceed the minimum bend radii for cables
  • Exceed the maximum pulling force for cables
  • Crush cable (e.g. by over tightening cable ties)
  • Strip too much cable sheath at termination points
  • Install cables where they could be damaged
  • Untwist too much of each cable pair
  • Use incorrect tools or fixing techniques.

A good installer will:

  • Work safely
  • Adhere to the necessary standards
  • Always follow the manufacturer’s guidelines.

LABELLING, RECORDS AND DOCUMENTATION

If your cabling system is well documented, any implementation, moves, additions or changes will be made simpler and problems more quickly diagnosed. You should develop a full administration scheme, complying with BS 6701 or your own country’s standards.

The level of detail will depend on the size and nature of your network and will include the following:

Labelling and records:

  • Identifiers
  • Labels
  • Records
  • Reports
  • Drawings
  • Work Orders (documenting all moves, additions and changes).

Documentation should contain some or all of the following:

  • Topology diagram (schematic layout)
  • Floor plans routes
  • Equipment room layout
  • Outlet locations
  • Patching closet location
  • Equipment termination location
  • Telecommunications or equipment room layout
  • Cabinet layout
  • Patching / cross connect records
  • Test schedules / results
  • Identification of test equipment used
  • Certificate of conformity.

Depending on your experience and the complexity of the installation, expert assistance may be needed to complete the specification.

Find out more about Black Box’s design and installation services here, or register for a free consultation.

Watch out for the final post on how to specify an IT cabling system:-

  • Testing of Copper and Fibre Links [Part 4]

‘How to’ Guide for specifying an IT Cabling System [Part 2] – Selecting an ICT Cabling System

This is the second in a series of posts where we offer guidelines on how to produce a specification for an IT cabling system.  Today we review industry standards, the types of cable available, and the capabilities of copper and fibre.

Standards

Cabling systems are often specified using USA standards, e.g. Cat 5e or Cat 6. However, you should get assurance from your installer that your new cabling system will comply with your country’s structured cabling standards. For the purpose of this document we are using BS EN (British Standard, European Norm) standards, namely:

  • BS EN 50173 series for performance and components
  • BS EN 50174 series for design, installation, operation and maintenance
  • BS 6701 for installation, operation and maintenance
  • BS EN 50310 for grounding and bonding
  • BS EN 50346 for testing.

The standards specify a range of Classes or Categories of copper cabling systems, correctly referred to as balanced cabling systems. Amongst these are:

  • Class D – Comparable with TIA Cat 5e, supporting Gigabit Ethernet (1000BASE-T)
  • Class E – Comparable with TIA Cat 6, supporting Gigabit Ethernet (1000BASE-T) and 10Gigabit Ethernet (10GBASE-T) to a distance of 35m
  • Class EA – Comparable with TIA Cat 6A, supporting 10 Gigabit Ethernet (10GBASE-T)
  • Class F – Comparable with TIA Cat 7, supporting 10 Gigabit Ethernet (10GBASE-T)
  • Class FA – Supporting 10 Gigabit Ethernet (10GBASE-T).

Choose a class that will meet your bandwidth requirements for the foreseeable future and that will fit within your budget. Bear in mind that higher class cabling is more expensive, and requires larger containment and pathways as the cables have a bigger diameter.

Choice of Cabling Medium

Bandwidth, lengths of cable runs, and environmental influences will determine your choice of cabling medium. In a typical enterprise installation, it is customary to use balanced twisted pair copper cables to service work areas although optical fibre cabling may be a better choice if security or electromagnetic interference are significant considerations.

Class D (Cat 5e), Class E (Cat 6) and Class EA (Cat 6A) cables are available as unshielded (UTP) and shielded (e.g. STP, FTP). Class F and Class FA have an overall shield only and each pair is individually foil-shielded. Unshielded cable is suitable for some installations but shielded cable may be required if high levels of electromagnetic interference are present or if a high “tempest” rating is required for security purposes. Also, in the case of Class EA, the unshielded variant has a larger diameter so requires larger containment.

The following circumstances, commonly found in backbones, may make it necessary to select optical fibre cabling:

  • If the length of a cable run is over 90m
  • If each end of the cable terminates in different electrical earth zones. This is often the case if nodes are in different buildings – a non-metallic optical fibre cable is far less likely to conduct damaging electricity in the event of a lightning strike
  • If the cable is routed externally. In this case sheaths need to be more rugged and weatherproof. This is more often available for optical fibre cables
  • If the space in the cable containment is limited; a multi-core fibre can carry many times the volume of data cable
  • If a high level of security is required; optical fibre is secure against unauthorized access.

Selecting the Right Optical Fibre Cable

The selection of OM1, OM2, OM3, OM4 or OS1/OS2 optical fibre cabling depends on the network application and the distance. OM1-OM4 cables are multimode whilst OS1 and OS2 cables are singlemode.

*Distances listed are industry minimums.

Mechanical Protection and Physical Properties

The selection of cable sheath material such as PVC, Low Smoke Zero Halogen (LSZH) or plenum rated, depends on the attitude to risk, local regulations and the requirements of other interested parties e.g. premises owners and insurance companies.

Optical fibre cables may need to be armoured and rodent-resistant to give protection in ducts or for direct burial.

Lifetime Cost Effectiveness

A cabling system represents the element of a network that has the longest life span so should be designed and installed with at the very least 10 years of useable life. To ensure consistent performance throughout the life of the system, the following should be considered:

  • Warranty and performance guarantees from the component manufacturer
  • Quality components proven to meet appropriate standards
  • Manufacturer and supplier support
  • The installers have relevant qualifications and training and their installation methods fully comply with country standards.

Depending on your knowledge and the complexity of your requirement, expert assistance may be needed to complete the specification.

Find out more about Black Box’s design and installation services here, or register for a free consultation.

Watch out for future posts on how to specify an IT cabling system, including:-

  • Cable Pathways, Installation Techniques and Documentation [Part 3]
  • Testing of Copper and Fibre Links [Part 4]

MPO vs. MTP: What’s the difference?

MPO stands for multi-fibre push-on connector. It is a connector for multi-fibre ribbon cable that generally contains 6, 8, 12 or 24 fibres. It is defined by IEC-61754-7 and TIA-604-5-D, also known as FOCIS 5. The MPO connector, combined with lightweight ribbon cable, represents a huge technological advancement over traditional multi-fibre cables. It’s lighter, more compact, easier to install and less expensive.

A single MPO connector replaces up to 12 or 24 fibre strands in a single connector. This very high density means lower space requirements and reduced costs for your installation. Traditional, tight-buffered multi-fibre cable needs to have each fibre individually terminated by a skilled technician. But MPO fibre optic cable, which carries multiple fibres, comes pre-terminated. Just plug it in and you’re ready to go.

MPO connectors feature an intuitive push-pull latching sleeve mechanism with an audible click upon connection and are easy to use. The MPO connector is similar to the MT-RJ connector. The MPO’s ferrule surface of 2.45 x 6.40 mm is slightly bigger than the MT-RJ’s, and the latching mechanism works with a sliding sleeve latch rather than a push-in latch.

The MPO connector can be either male or female. You can tell the male connector by the two alignment pins protruding from the end of the ferrule. MPO female connectors will have holes in the ferrule to accept the alignment pins from the male connector. The MPO ferrule is generally flat for multimode applications and angled for single-mode applications.

MPO connectors are also commonly called MTP® connectors, which is a registered trademark of US Conec. The MTP connector is an MPO connector engineered with particular enhancements to improve optical and mechanical performance. Significant MTP enhancements include an elliptical pin shape, a floating ferrule design, a removable housing and more. Details can be found at usconec.com. MPO and MTP connectors are compatible.

A 12-strand MPO connector features 12 fibres in a straight line, 1–12, left to right.

A 24-strand connector features two rows of fibre 1–12 and 13–24 with the white dot also indicating pin 1.

Each connector has a key on one side of the connector body. When the key sits on top, it is referred to as key up. When the key sits on the bottom, it’s called key down.

When planning your system, keep in mind that you can’t mix and match 12-strand and 24-strand cable versions.

Find out more about our MPO/MTP cables and fibre services, or contact us today for a free consultation.

‘How to’ Guide for Specifying an IT Cabling System [Part 1] – Requirements and Preparation

Over a series of posts we offer guidelines on how to produce a specification for an IT cabling system that meets your organisation’s needs and gives you value for money.

Today we provide a checklist of the elements you should include and the information you should gather before starting work on the specification.

Requirements

Assuming you need a conventional structured cabling system using RJ45 connectors, the completed specification should include details on all or some of the following:

  • The Class or Category of cabling system e.g. Class D/Cat 5e, Class E/Cat 6 etc.
  • The number and locations of outlets
  • The location and type of telecommunications rooms and spaces
  • Backbone cabling between telecommunications rooms and spaces
  • Cabling pathways and containment
  • Labelling systems and methods
  • Patching facilities and patch cords
  • Testing
  • Administration system
  • Minimum warranty period.

Preparation

Before starting work on the specification, gather and document all the following information if relevant to your installation:

  • A plan (preferably) or dimensions of the areas to be cabled
  • The number of staff requiring IT and/or voice services
  • The services required per workstation, e.g. voice, data
  • Business expansion plans
  • Applications to be supported
  • The highest network speed anticipated during the expected life of the cabling system
  • Ethernet switches and other IT infrastructure hardware to be supported
  • Printers and other peripherals to be supported
  • Voice backbone / distribution requirements
  • The maximum backbone bandwidth expected during the life of the cabling system
  • Building management systems integration
  • Telephone system details
  • Location of Telecommunications Rooms (for edge networking hardware)
  • Location of Equipment Rooms (for core networking hardware)
  • Location of Entrance Facilities for incoming telecommunications lines
  • Locations for cabinets or racks, or space in existing cabinets and racks
  • Cable routes between floors, across floors and between buildings
  • Existing earthing facilities
  • The fire rating requirement of the cable
  • Any known or potential hazards e.g. asbestos, exposed high voltages, etc.

Depending on your knowledge and the complexity of your requirement, expert assistance may be needed to complete the specification.
Find out more about Black Box’s design and installation services here, or register for a free consultation.

Watch out for future posts on how to specify an IT cabling system, including:-

Selecting an ICT Cabling System [Part 2]
Cable Pathways, Installation Techniques and Documentation [Part 3]
Testing of Copper and Fibre Links [Part 4]

Simplify Your Data Centre Build-outs and Upgrades

Enterprises today face new challenges for managing and storing vast amounts of data. The growth in ‘Big Data’, the Internet of Things, a remote workforce and the massive uptake in personal devices have all had an impact on how and where data is stored, and have attributed to the proliferation of data centres.

Building an end-to-end data centre solution requires evaluation, planning, design and deployment skills, whether it is 6 cabinets in a room, or 6000 cabinets spread over a campus site.

Your service supplier should have the relevant processes in place, and the qualified staff to make the transition as simple as possible, including:

APPROACH

  • Standardisation of processes
  • Uniformity with build layouts and designs
  • Certified Data Centre Design Professionals (CDCDP)
  • Registered Communications Distribution Designers (RCDD)
  • PRINCE2 Project Managers and fully trained Data Engineers
  • Project engineering – AutoCAD® and Visio® with isometric renderings
  • Materials control through kitting, optimum stocking, and delivery planning
  • Seamless worldwide project coordination, if required.

SERVICES

  • End-state design and build
  • Containment systems
  • Rack and stack
  • Structured cabling – pre-terminated copper and fibre
  • Wireless
  • Environmental monitoring
  • KVM solutions
  • Security
  • Project management
  • Relocations
  • Multi-site rollouts
  • Permanent on-site Engineers and Project Managers

Black Box has more than 40 years’ experience implementing data centres throughout the world.  We have a large staff of BICSI Registered Communications Distribution Designers so clients can rest assured that the design will be future-proofed for their needs today, tomorrow and in years to come.

Our global footprint, extensive technical and project management resources, diverse experience and established industry relationships make Black Box a trusted partner for any data centre project.

Find out more about our services here or contact us today for a free consultation.

Why Organisations Are Turning To IT Service Providers

Enterprise IT requires time, attention and resources.  Increasingly organisations are turning to external IT Service providers to assist in the daily running of their networks.  Some of the main reasons include:

  1. Increased demand on IT

    Continuous advances in IT are rapidly changing the way companies do business.  Changes in user requirements, challenges with managing both legacy and new technology, and shifts in managing IT expenses are shaping corporate IT landscapes.

  2. Chief Information Officers are concerned they are missing the IT expertise

    Many IT departments find it challenging to stay current and proficient with the rapid evolution of new IT business technologies and applications.  Supporting complex, enterprise-critical technology requires a depth of expertise and knowledge not always available internally.

  3. To reduce IT costs and align with cash flow

    The strategic use of IT Services makes sense for companies driven to improve cost efficiency and maximise their IT spend.  IT Services provide companies with the flexibility to determine the best use of their IT budget.  Utilising IT Services also helps to adjust and balance CAPEX and OPEX expenditures to align with cash flow and finance objectives.

How Black Box Can Help

Black Box offers an intelligent, customised portfolio of IT Service Solutions that meet a variety of needs.  We partner with our customers to identify, design, and execute time-saving and cost-effective strategies that are in line with their current and evolving enterprise objectives.

Comprehensive IT Services Portfolio

The Black Box team blends seamlessly into your workflow—assuming responsibilities and offering unobtrusive, yet focused and high-quality, support.
For more information download our IT Service Solutions brochure here or request a free consultation.

“The Black Box team is an integral part of the day-to-day-operations … they understand what we need to run smoothly, and our two teams work seamlessly as one.”